Kristian’s family

Jan Ditmar ringing bells inside the church. The church in Klæbu is over 200 years old, and among the very few churches in Norway where the usher rings the bells inside the church.

Jan Ditmar ringing bells inside the church. The church in Klæbu is over 200 years old, and among the very few churches in Norway where the usher rings the bells inside the church.

I grew up close to the city of Trondheim 500 kilometers north of Oslo, even if my family have their roots in the south of Norway, and also in Bergen. My mother, Marie, born on Oct 31, 1939, still lives in Klæbu, 20 kilometers south of Trondheim. However, my father died on July 14, 2004, four days after his 67th birthday. I have two older brothers, Jan Ditmar and Torleif.

Jan Ditmar was born on Feb. 2, 1968, exactly four years before me. He is happy with his music, and he gives a lot of happiness to his surroundings with his harmonica. He is also working as an usher at the local church, where he rings the bells inside the church, assists the pastor with the infant baptisms, guides people to their seats, prepares the church before the services and manages the sound system. Jan Ditmar also has his own apartment one kilometer from my parents home, and he often comes over for supper.

Torleif is the master of remembering dates and names, and here he memorizes the family history at a family reunion. Ask him about any date of events in our family, and he has the answer right away.

Torleif is the master of remembering dates and names, and here he memorizes the family history at a family reunion. Ask him about any date of events in our family, and he has the answer right away.

My middle brother, Torleif, works as a debt counselor for the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration in Oslo. When people comes to the welfare office asking the government to give them money because they are in debt, my brother takes a look at their economy and suggest how they can manage their debt. He can for instant suggest that they get rid of their car or other luxury items. Since I haven’t had any debt problems, I haven’t had personal experiences with my brothers debt counseling, but everyone says my brother is good at his job.

Some years ago years ago, I bought a computer for my mom. If you haven’t used a computer before, that is very hard, especially if you are over 70 years old. However, now my mother has a reasonably fast ADSL line, and she is able to send emails and pay her bills online. I’m proud of you, mom!

 My mom and dad having breakfast at their house in Klæbu, which they build in 1994. The house was specially designed for wheel chair users, and it was easy for my dad to move around when he was alive. He also had different aids to help him.


My mom and dad having breakfast at their house in Klæbu, which they build in 1994. The house was specially designed for wheel chair users, and it was easy for my dad to move around when he was alive. He also had different aids to help him.

Just before Christmas 1991, my father got a brain stroke, and he had to retire from his ministry as a Lutheran pastor. It was a pity because my father was well-liked and he was a popular preacher. He was using a wheel chair ever since.

My childhood was a happy one, but I was not very fond of going to the kindergarten. When I was five, I decided that I’d had enough, and I ran away from kindergarten. I was being teased by the 9-year-old son of the owner 😉

I’ve always had an independent soul, and the first day of school, I didn’t want my mother to accompany me. I was old enough to manage my life on my own. Being independent minded also meant that I was full of pranks all the time, and I drove my surroundings crazy with my practical jokes, although my pranks never had bad intentions. When I was nine, I was with my father who was preaching at a Christian meeting. This was the kind of meeting where people told their testimonies, and it was a serious atmosphere. I thought this was a bit too depressive, and I raised my hand asking to tell a joke. The leader of the meeting says this is maybe not appropriate, and the meeting continues, for five minutes. Then the leader of the meeting cracks up in laughter, and that meeting is destroyed. That story made me famous all over Norway.

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